U.S. Will Send 1,000 More Troops to Middle East Amid Iran Tensions

U.S. Will Send 1,000 More Troops to Middle East Amid Iran TensionsThe Trump administration plans to send 1,000 more troops as well as additional military resources to the Middle East as tensions with Iran continue to simmer, the Defense Department announced Monday."In response to a request from the US Central Command for additional forces, and with the advice of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and in consultation with the White House, I have authorized approximately 1,000 additional troops for defensive purposes to address air, naval, and ground-based threats in the Middle East," read a statement from acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan."United States does not seek conflict with Iran," Shanahan said, but he highlighted recent threatening behavior by the state terror sponsor that could endanger U.S. forces."The recent Iranian attacks validate the reliable, credible intelligence we have received on hostile behavior by Iranian forces and their proxy groups that threaten United States personnel and interests across the region," the defense secretary said.Last month, the Trump administration deployed four bombers as well as the USS Abraham Lincoln carrier-strike group to the Persian Gulf amid fears that Iran was transporting short-range ballistic missiles in the region.Meanwhile, two oil tankers were apparently attacked in the Gulf of Oman last week, suffering a series of explosions that injured crew members. The U.S. Navy responded to the disaster offering assistance.Iran’s supreme leader also said this month that the U.S. would be powerless to stop Iran from obtaining nuclear weapons should it so desire and said no further negotiations with American leaders are forthcoming."The action today is being taken to ensure the safety and welfare of our military personnel working throughout the region and to protect our national interests," Shanahan said. "We will continue to monitor the situation diligently and make adjustments to force levels as necessary given intelligence reporting and credible threats."


Attorney: Officer attacked without warning in Costco

Attorney: Officer attacked without warning in CostcoThe off-duty officer who shot and killed a man inside a Southern California Costco last week was attacked without warning as he held his toddler son, the policeman's attorney said Monday. Attorney David Winslow said his client — a Los Angeles Police Department officer whom he wouldn't name — was struck from behind without a word being spoken Friday night as he fed his son samples of teriyaki chicken in the warehouse store in Corona, southeast of Los Angeles. The officer shot and killed French, 32, of Riverside, and critically wounded French's parents.


Young bear was fed by humans and had many 'fans.' Officials say they had to kill it

Young bear was fed by humans and had many 'fans.' Officials say they had to kill itA young black bear was shot and killed by Oregon officials after becoming so habituated to humans that people reportedly took selfies with it.


McConnell on Jon Stewart: 'I don't know why he's all bent out of shape' over 9/11 victims' fund

McConnell on Jon Stewart: 'I don't know why he's all bent out of shape' over 9/11 victims' fundThe Senate majority leader says he can’t understand why the former “Daily Show” host is angry over the handling of health care funding for 9/11 victims.


Accidental cat filter turns press conference live stream into a meme

Accidental cat filter turns press conference live stream into a memeIn something of a ridiculous and yet lighthearted story, a Pakistani politician's press briefing with journalists recently became comedic fodder after a cat filter was applied to the faces of individuals being recorded via Facebook live. The incident, which was attributed to human error, showcased regional minister Shaukat Yousafzai -- and others -- with cat ears and whiskers while talking about otherwise serious topics.The cat filter was live for a few minutes before someone noticed it and promptly removed it. But for a few glorious minutes last Friday, viewers were witness to an event seemingly lifted out of a kids-version of Black Mirror.The Guardian reports:> It was several minutes before organisers realised that the minister had acquired pointy ears. When one of his moustached party colleagues began to speak, looking earnest and holding a pen, he too was transformed into a cat.> > Party followers watching online immediately started making jokes at the expense of Pakistan's provincial Khyber Pakhtunkhwa government. They offered up a whole series of feline puns.Hardly a surprise, folks on Twitter had a field day with the minor debacle. And truth be told, using photo filters during all political events might actually persuade more people to become politically active.https://twitter.com/nailainayat/status/1139583166115540992All told, it's been interesting to see how quickly filters have evolved. Back during the early days of Instagram, for example, photo filters were relatively straight forward and simply involved adding some nice tonal effects to photos. These days, with Snapchat leading the way, photo and video filters have transformed dramatically. Today, filters have become incredibly quirky and now exist across a multitude of social networking sites and apps.


Field fires in Syria's Hasakeh kill 10: monitor

Field fires in Syria's Hasakeh kill 10: monitorFires engulfing vital wheat fields across Syria's northeast have killed at least 10 people, a war monitor said Sunday, as Kurdish authorities claim the blazes were set deliberately. Kurdish authorities and the Damascus regime are competing to buy up this year's harvest as fires -- some claimed by the Islamic State group -- continue to scorch crops in the country's breadbasket. The victims included civilians and members of the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces who died while trying to extinguish the blazes since Saturday, the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said.


Mexico detains nearly 800 undocumented migrants in four trucks

Mexico detains nearly 800 undocumented migrants in four trucksMexican officials detained nearly 800 undocumented migrants in eastern Mexico in four trucks on Saturday, the government said, in one of the biggest swoops against illegal immigration in recent months. Mexico's National Migration Institute (INM) said in a statement late on Saturday that 791 foreign nationals were found in the trucks stopped in the eastern state of Veracruz, confirming earlier reports about a mass detention. The apprehension came as Mexico steps up efforts to reduce a surge of migrants toward the U.S. border under pressure from U.S. President Donald Trump, who has vowed to hit Mexican goods with tariffs if Mexico does not stem illegal immigration.


Japan protests Chinese activity near disputed islands

Japan protests Chinese activity near disputed islandsJapan has protested what is says was an unauthorized Chinese maritime survey within its economic waters near disputed East China Sea islands, officials said Monday. Japan's Foreign Ministry said it lodged a protest with Beijing after a Chinese maritime research ship was seen dropping a wire-like object into the water off the northwestern coast of Japanese-controlled Senkaku islands on Sunday. China also claims the islands, which it calls Diaoyu.


Alibaba Plans Stock Split as It Preps Giant Listing

Alibaba Plans Stock Split as It Preps Giant Listing(Bloomberg) -- Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. plans a one-to-eight share split, as the e-commerce giant prepares for a stock sale that could be Hong Kong’s largest since 2010.China’s largest company is proposing to increase the number of ordinary shares eight-fold to 32 billion, it said in a statement. The proposal will be discussed and put to a vote at its annual general meeting in Hong Kong on July 15. If approved, the split should take place no later than July 2020.Alibaba is said to have filed for a listing in Hong Kong last week via a confidential exchange application. That sale of stock, which could raise as much as $20 billion, replenishes the online retailer’s war-chest and helps it attract investors closer to home as tensions between China and the U.S. escalate.In the Hong Kong offering, the company will seek to preserve its governance system, where a partnership of top executives has rights including the ability to nominate a majority of board members, a person familiar with the matter has said. It’s possible also that the company may not need to seek a waiver, as the city’s listing rules allow some Chinese issuers who have already listed on an established international bourse to keep their existing structures in a secondary listing.To contact the reporter on this story: Lulu Yilun Chen in Hong Kong at ychen447@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net, Edwin ChanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


US releases new photos it says incriminate Iran in tanker attacks

US releases new photos it says incriminate Iran in tanker attacksThe United States military on Monday released new photos it says incriminate Iran in an attack last week on a tanker ship in strategic Gulf waters. The US argument centers on an unexploded limpet mine on the Kokuka Courageous ship it says was removed by Iranians on a patrol boat. "Iran is responsible for the attack based on video evidence and the resources and proficiency needed to quickly remove the unexploded limpet mine," the Pentagon said in a statement accompanying the imagery.


Bill Cosby's post as 'America's Dad' on Father's Day sparks anger online

Bill Cosby's post as 'America's Dad' on Father's Day sparks anger online"Hey, Hey, Hey...It's America's Dad... I know it's late, but to all of the Dads... It's an honor to be called a Father, so let's make today a renewed oath to fulfilling our purpose - strengthening our families and communities," Cosby posted on Instagram late Sunday night. Cosby, 81, who last year was convicted of drugging and sexually attacking former Temple University administrator Andrea Constand in 2004, requested the message be posted after he gave a Father's Day speech to fellow inmates at maximum-security SCI Phoenix facility outside Philadelphia, where he is serving a 3- to 10-year sentence.


Oklahomans Fall Mysteriously Ill While on Trip to the Dominican Republic

Oklahomans Fall Mysteriously Ill While on Trip to the Dominican Republic47 out of 114 people traveling to the Dominican Republic with an Oklahoma City travel agency became sick during their vacation. One person said they lost 14 pounds, and others were unable to get out of bed.


Unruly passenger hits flight attendant, then pukes during Delta flight to Paris

Unruly passenger hits flight attendant, then pukes during Delta flight to ParisA federal complaint says a man struck a flight attendant in the throat and then threw up during a Delta flight to Paris.


Gun Fact: The Glock 18 Fires 1,200 Bullets Per Minute

Gun Fact: The Glock 18 Fires 1,200 Bullets Per MinuteThe Glock 18 accepts typical Glock magazines, from ten to seventeen rounds, but a handgun with a rate of fire of 1,200 rounds a minute can empty a standard pistol magazine in a blink of an eye. In order to help feed the Glock 18’s voracious appetite the company released thirty-three round magazines. These longer magazines extend far past the magazine well, making the gun difficult to conceal but double available firepower.In December 2003, soldiers of the U.S. Special Operations Command captured the Ace of Spades himself, Saddam Hussein. The former Iraqi president, on the run since the capture of Baghdad, had appeared in a deck of playing cards with the profiles of other fugitive war criminals and naturally was the top card. Hussein, bedraggled and bereft, was armed with one of the rarest of handguns: the Glock 18, the full auto Glock.(This first appeared several months ago.)In February 1980 the Austrian Army issued a requirement for a new handgun. Gaston Glock, a knifemaker who made knives and bayonets for the army, decided to try his hand at the gun manufacturing business. After buying and trying many types of existing handguns, consulting with firearm specialists to see what they would like in a handgun, and a presumably a great deal of trial and error, Glock’s first pistol, the Glock 17, won the army contract for twenty thousand pistols.


Ex-Tehran mayor to face trial over wife's killing

Ex-Tehran mayor to face trial over wife's killingFormer Tehran mayor and prominent reformist Mohammad Ali Najafi will stand trial next month on charges of murdering his wife, the government-run Iran newspaper said Sunday. Najafi, 67, turned himself in and confessed to shooting his second wife Mitra Ostad on May 28 at their home in northern Tehran, according to Iranian media. "On July 1, the first trial session of Mohammad Ali Najafi, former Tehran mayor, will be held at Tehran's Criminal Court," the Iran daily reported.


View Photos of the 2020 BMW X3 M

View Photos of the 2020 BMW X3 M


China's Xi to visit North Korea as US nuke diplomacy stalls

China's Xi to visit North Korea as US nuke diplomacy stallsChinese President Xi Jinping will make a state visit to North Korea this week, state media announced Monday, as U.S. talks with North Korea on its nuclear program are at an apparent standstill. Xi will meet with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during the visit on Thursday and Friday, Chinese state broadcaster CCTV said. North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency also announced the visit, but provided no further details.


Pompeo: Fox News host's questioning Trump's FBI comments a ‘Washington piece of silliness’

Pompeo: Fox News host's questioning Trump's FBI comments a ‘Washington piece of silliness’When Fox News host Chris Wallace asked Pompeo Sunday if “accepting oppo research from a foreign government right or wrong?” the former CIA director responded: “Chris, you know, you asked me not to call any of your questions today ridiculous. “President Trump has been very clear that he will always make sure that he gets it right for the American people and I’m confident he’ll do that here as well,” Pompeo said. Trump in an interview last week with ABC’s George Stephanopoulos said that he would take damaging information — which he referred to as “oppo research” instead of as interference in a U.S. election by foreign governments — and that he would do so without necessarily alerting the FBI.


China earthquake kills 12, injures 134

China earthquake kills 12, injures 134The toll from a strong 6.0-magnitude earthquake in southwest China rose to 12 dead and 134 injured on Tuesday as rescuers pulled bodies and survivors from wrecked buildings. More than 4,000 people were relocated as a large number of structures were damaged or collapsed after the quake struck late Monday near Yibin in Sichuan province, according to the city government. Other images showed a woman being helped out of another collapsed structure.


Justice Thomas urges U.S. Supreme Court to feel free to reverse precedents

Justice Thomas urges U.S. Supreme Court to feel free to reverse precedentsWriting in a gun possession case over whether the federal government and states can prosecute someone separately for the same crime, Thomas said the court should reconsider its standard for reviewing precedents. Thomas said the nine justices should not uphold precedents that are "demonstrably erroneous," regardless of whether other factors supported letting them stand. "When faced with a demonstrably erroneous precedent, my rule is simple: We should not follow it," wrote Thomas, who has long expressed a greater willingness than his colleagues to overrule precedents.


Mexico Reinforces Checks Amid U.S. Pressure Over Migrant Flow

Mexico Reinforces Checks Amid U.S. Pressure Over Migrant FlowThe National Migration Institute said 1,000 immigration agents had been deployed


Hawaiian, Southwest, Allegiant top Forbes list of fastest airlines in the U.S.

Hawaiian, Southwest, Allegiant top Forbes list of fastest airlines in the U.S.Hawaiian, Southwest and Allegiant airlines topped the list that measured efficiency and government on-time percentage rates.


The Latest: Airbus is ready for autonomous planes; are you?

The Latest:  Airbus is ready for autonomous planes; are you?The chief salesman for Airbus says his company already has the technology to fly passenger planes without pilots at all — and is working on winning over regulators and travelers to the idea. Christian Scherer also said in an interview with The Associated Press on Monday that Airbus hopes to be selling hybrid or electric passenger jets by around 2035. While the company is still far from ready to churn out battery-operated jumbo jets, Scherer said Airbus already has "the technology for autonomous flying" and for planes flown by just one pilot.


Erdogan says drilling off Cyprus to continue despite warning

Erdogan says drilling off Cyprus to continue despite warningTurkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Sunday said Turkey would not back down from gas exploration in Cyprus after southern European leaders urged Ankara to stop. "We continue and will continue to search in those areas that are ours," Erdogan said during a televised speech in Istanbul. You will come off badly if you do so," Erdogan warned, after Cyprus reportedly issued arrests warrants for crew members of Turkey's drilling ship, Fatih, last week.


Gun 'Van Gogh killed himself with' to be auctioned

Gun 'Van Gogh killed himself with' to be auctionedThe revolver with which Vincent van Gogh is believed to have shot himself is to go under the hammer Wednesday at a Paris auction house.


Father's Day 2019: Paganism, roses and how the campaign to celebrate dads was won

Father's Day 2019: Paganism, roses and how the campaign to celebrate dads was wonFather's Day, the official calendar date to honour our wonderful dads and celebrate fatherhood, is here. Recognised each June, the day sees children around the world present their dads with cards and gifts as a thank you for all they do. But when did the first observance of Father's Day take place and who helped establish the annual celebration of paternal figures? From the history behind the celebration, to the more recent commercialisation, here is everything you need to know about Father's Day. When is Father's Day 2019? Father’s Day is held every year on the third Sunday of June; this year Father’s Day falls on Sunday, June 16 in the UK. Typically, fathers are showered with cards and presents on Father’s Day, with some families celebrating together by going on days out.  Younger children also tend to make handmade gifts for their fathers at school and extracurricular clubs, including drawings, paintings or cards. As society and family structures have changed, some people now celebrate their stepfathers on Father’s Day.  In recent years there have been calls for a Stepfather's Day, however no such day has been officially discussed or introduced. Father's Day falls on June 16 this year Credit: E+ The history of Father's Day The first events in recognition of fatherhood took place in the US and followed Anna Jarvis' first celebration of Mother's Day in 1908, as well as the earlier observations of Mothering Sunday in the UK. Grace Golden Clayton, from Fairmont, West Virginia, was the woman behind the first event to celebrate fathers in 1908. Just over a year prior to this event, the Monongah Mining Disaster took place in December 1907, with the explosion killing 361 men. Of these fatalities, 250 were fathers. In honour of the one thousand children who lost their fathers, Clayton encouraged her pastor, Rev. Robert Thomas Webb, to hold a service at the Williams Memorial Methodist Episcopal Church South. Clayton missed her own father terribly, after he passed away in 1896, so she chose to honour the lives lost on July 5, 1908, the closest date to his birthday. While Clayton was responsible for the first recognition of fatherhood and the paternal bond, her work didn't directly encourage the creation of Father's Day. The memorial service was never promoted outside the town of Fairmont and the service was overshadowed by the significant Independence Day celebrations held a day beforehand. Yet the idea was also picked up on in the following year, when Sonora Smart Dodd started her quest to honour fathers in the same way as mothers. Dodd, born in Arkansas in 1882, was one of six children and at the age of seven, she moved to Washington with her family. When she was 16 years old, her mother, Ellen Victoria Cheek Smart, died after giving birth to her sixth child, leaving her father, William Jackson Smart, a farmer and Civil War veteran, as a single parent.  After listening to a Mother's Day sermon at the Central Methodist Episcopal Church in 1909, Dodd felt that fathers deserved equal recognition. With the local YMCA and the Ministerial Association of Spokane, Dodd began a campaign to have the day officially recognised. The first such 'Father’s Day' was held at the YMCA in Spokane on June 19, 1910, with a number of towns and cities across America later following suit.  Support for Father’s Day quickly increased throughout the US and in 1924 President Calvin Coolidge pressured state governments to mark the celebration. President Lyndon Johnson issued the first presidential proclamation honouring fathers in 1966, making the third Sunday in June Father’s Day. Six years later President Richard Nixon signed it into law, establishing the day as a national holiday – though in the UK it does not enjoy this status. The move came after a campaign by a number of public figures, including Senator Margaret Chase Smith, who in 1957 wrote to Congress: “Either we honour both our parents, mother and father, or let us desist from honouring either one. “But to single out just one of our two parents and omit the other is the most grievous insult imaginable.” Dodd's message later spread to other countries across the globe and it is thought that Britain began celebrating Father's Day after World War II. Today, the celebration of fathers has become an important commercial event for high street shops and online retailers, with promotions for the best gifts and cards appearing in the build up to the day each year. Father’s Day around the world While in the UK fathers can expect, at best, breakfast in bed and handmade card and, at worst, the day to be completely ignored, elsewhere the festival is done a little differently. In Germany, Father’s Day is called Vatertag with it also being referred to as Männertag, which means men’s day. The celebration falls on the Thursday 40 days after Easter. In certain regions it is traditional for groups of men to go into the woods with a wagon of beer, wines and meats. Heavy drinking is common and, according to official statistics, traffic-related accidents spike on this day. In Australia, Father’s Day falls on the first Sunday of September, which is their first Sunday of Spring, while in Croatia, they observe Roman Catholic tradition and celebrate fathers on March 19, Saint Joseph’s Day. In China, Father’s Day used to be celebrated on August 8 as the Chinese for eight is “ba”, while a colloquial word for father is “ba-ba” – so the eighth day of the eighth month sounds similar to “daddy”. The day has since been moved to the third Sunday of June, in line with the UK and US. In France, the day was introduced in 1949 for commercial reasons by lighter manufacturer Flaminaire. Inspired by the US' day of celebration, they created a new advert with the slogan 'Nos papas nous l'ont dit, pour la fête des pères, ils désirent tous un Flaminaire' ('Our fathers told us, for father's day, they all want a Flaminaire'). Three years later an official decree was made to recognise the day. Most countries celebrate Father’s Day on the third Sunday in June including the UK, USA, Mexico, Ireland, France, Greece, China and Japan.  However not all countries celebrate it then. In Brazil, Father’s Day falls on the second Sunday of August and this day was chosen in honour of Saint Joachim, the patron saint of fathers. According to Catholic, Anglican and Orthodox traditions, Joachim was the father of Mary, the mother of Jesus. The ultimate films on fatherhood Father's Day tales and traditions Some pagans suggest that Father's Day is closely linked to the Pagan Sun worship, because the sun is thought to be the father of the universe and the celebration of dads falls closely to the summer solstice. Roses are the official flower of Father's Day, with people previously wearing them to church on this date. While this tradition is rarely seen today, sons and daughters used to wear either a red rose in admiration of a living father or a white rose in memory of a deceased father. Sonora Smart Dodd, the founder of Father's Day, selected this flower and it is said that during the early celebrations, she handed out roses to home-bound fathers, while on a horse-drawn carriage ride around the city. Father's Day gifts and presents From cutesy cards, socks and ties to luxurious watches and fantastic car experiences, Britons present their paternal figures with an array of unique gifts on Father's Day.  But, demand for the perfect Father's Day present has led to the increasing commercialisation of the day, with retailers competing to offer the best gifts and consumers heading to their high street shops and online retailers.  According to MuchNeeded, Father's Day is a popular shopping day in both the UK and US, with 75 per cent of men expected to celebrate the occasion this year. While Britons and Americans spend a significant amount on Father's Day each year, on average it only accounts for half the spending around Mother's Day. Is it Father's Day, Fathers' Day or Fathers Day? Ah, the age old question. The answer? Many say Father's Day is the correct version. Mother's Day (which has the apostrophe before the 's') set the precedent while Father's Day was still gaining popularity. Anna Jarvis trademarked the term 'Mother's Day' – with the apostrophe before the 's' – in 1912, saying the word should 'be a singular possessive, for each family to honour its own mother, not a plural possessive commemorating all mothers in the world'. President Woodrow Wilson used this spelling when he formalised Mother's Day in 1914; this means the correct version of the word is spelled with the apostrophe before the 's'. Father's Day has followed suit, with cards on both sides of the pond including the apostrophe in the same place.


Analysis: China blinks, but divide from Hong Kong remains

Analysis: China blinks, but divide from Hong Kong remainsThe leader of China, it turns out, may not be all-powerful. Faced with huge and disruptive protests in Hong Kong, China blinked. The decision to shelve the legislation that sparked the demonstrations shows that limits still exist to how hard China can, or is willing, to push.


Is showing compassion to migrants a crime?

Is showing compassion to migrants a crime?Trump – and governments across the western world – are putting humanitarians on trial. That should scare us Scott Warren, a border activist charged with giving migrants water, food and lodging at the Arizona-Mexico border, has argued that his spiritual values compel him to help all people in distress. Photograph: Charlie Riedel/Associated Press On 11 June, a federal jury in Tucson, Arizona refused to convict the immigration activist Scott Warren on felony charges that could have sent him to prison for twenty years. What had Warren done to merit such extreme punishment? In January 2018, he committed the unconscionable act of offering food, water, and lodging to two migrants who had crossed the US-Mexico border without authorization. Warren is a member of the group No More Deaths, an organization founded in 2004 to stop the epidemic of migrant fatalities occurring in Arizona’s unforgiving Sonoran desert. Their work is constant, necessary, and honorable. After all, more than 7,000 people have perished crossing the US-Mexico border, according to US government statistics, though the actual number is almost certainly much higher. Over a third of those deaths are in the Arizona desert. But the work of No More Deaths is now under threat. While most Americans are aware that Trump has increased border enforcement since coming into office, fewer probably realize that migrants are not the only ones targeted by his administration. New guidelines issued by the then attorney general, Jeff Sessions, in 2017 order prosecutors to prioritize “any case involving the unlawful transportation or harboring of aliens”. With Warren’s arrest, the Trump administration is putting humanitarianism itself on trial. (A hearing on 2 July will determine if Warren’s case proceeds.) That the jury deadlocked in this case is a small sign of hope for those of us who hold on to the basic, though essential, notion of our shared humanity. Make no mistake about it, however. Warren’s trial is yet another example of that specific kind of nastiness that is coming to define our age – one that venerates political borders over human life at almost any cost. Ours is an era when cruelty masquerades as policy and compassion is increasingly viewed as a crime. Nor is this solely an American phenomenon. All over the western world, governments are militarizing their borders, ratcheting up immigration enforcement, and prosecuting humanitarian workers. The British volunteer Tom Ciotkowski is currently on trial in France, facing up to five years in prison on assault and contempt charges. Last summer, Ciotkowski was filming French police checking the IDs of volunteers distributing food to refugees and migrants in Calais. When he observed a police officer pushing and kicking another volunteer, Ciotkowski complained, only to be pushed himself and then arrested. Amnesty International has taken up his case. Then there’s the case of the German boat captain Pia Klemp, currently facing criminal charges in Italy. Klemp is reported to have assisted in the rescue of more than 1,000 people in the burial waters known as the Mediterranean (where more than 18,000 people have died in the sea since 2014). Anti-migrant sentiment was already high in Italy, but with the rise of rightwing populists such as Italy’s interior minister, Matteo Salvini, the crackdown on migrants and humanitarian actors has expanded. Klemp faces up to 20 years in prison for assisting illegal immigration. More than 111,000 people have signed a petition demanding her release. Today’s criminalization of humanitarian assistance is sustained, widespread, and growing. A recent study by openDemocracy discovered that “more than 250 people across 14 countries have been arrested, charged, or investigated under a range of laws over the last five years for supporting migrants”. The study found that there had been a dramatic increase in this harassment over the last 18 months and that it had targeted such figures as “a priest nominated for the Nobel peace prize, a football player, firefighters, rural farmers, ex-soldiers, pensioners, a university professor and several local politicians”. The cases make for painful, if sometimes ridiculous, reading. The Swiss pastor Norbert Valley was arrested in the middle of a church service for sheltering a Togolese man who had just been denied asylum. A high-profile couple in Denmark were convicted of the crime of “harboring” for giving a Syrian migrant family a lift and taking them home for coffee and biscuits. A French mountain guide was charged last year with aiding and abetting illegal immigration after he rescued a Nigerian woman about to give birth in the snow and drove her to the hospital. He got lucky after prosecutors later dropped the charges, citing “humanitarian immunity”. She delivered her baby that night. Populists and nationalists will malign these humanitarian volunteers as witting or unwitting helpers of human traffickers, but that’s simply not true. There is not a shred of solid evidence to substantiate such a claim. The real danger lies not in the humanitarianism but in its criminalization. In both Europe and the United States, discourses about dangerous migrant hordes invading our civilized lands abound. The migrants, we’re told, pose a fundamental threat to our values, to who we are. But when our leaders make compassion itself a crime, just what set of values do they think they’re protecting? Who needs an invader when we can destroy ourselves, perfectly well, one trial of a humanitarian volunteer at a time. Moustafa Bayoumi is the author of How Does It Feel To Be a Problem?: Being Young and Arab in America


UK PM front-runner Johnson pledges to 'end the digital divide' by 2025

UK PM front-runner Johnson pledges to 'end the digital divide' by 2025Boris Johnson, the front-runner to replace Prime Minister Theresa May, pledged on Sunday to "end the digital divide" in Britain with the rollout of full fiber broadband by 2025. Using his column in the Telegraph newspaper, Johnson, who was criticized for missing the first television debate on Sunday with the other contenders for Conservative Party leader, said he would speed up the rollout of full fiber broadband. "The government has just set a new target for the 100 per cent roll-out of full fiber broadband – by 2033! ... As a deadline, that is laughably unambitious," he wrote.


600 people on Monsanto 'watch lists' in Germany, France: Bayer

600 people on Monsanto 'watch lists' in Germany, France: BayerUS seeds and pesticides maker Monsanto kept lists of around 600 key pro- and anti-pesticides figures in Germany and France alone, its German parent company Bayer said Monday amid a widening probe. Bayer has admitted the lists covered politicians, journalists and others across seven European countries and in Brussels. "Update on Monsanto stakeholder lists: until the end of last week, the firm hired by Bayer contacted all the people on the German and French lists," Bayer's press department tweeted.


'We don't take it lightly': What we know about oil tanker blasts and Donald Trump's escalating rhetoric on Iran

'We don't take it lightly': What we know about oil tanker blasts and Donald Trump's escalating rhetoric on IranPresident Donald Trump's comments come amid concerns attack on oil tankers could further escalate ongoing tensions between Iran and the U.S.


Safety and pollution top of the agenda as Paris Air Show opens

Safety and pollution top of the agenda as Paris Air Show opensAviation executives descended on the Paris Air Show on Monday with pledges to improve transparency over plane safety in the wake of the Boeing 737 MAX crisis and to reduce emissions. With passenger traffic slowing this year, the atmosphere at the fair, where arch-rivals Boeing and Airbus vie for aircraft orders, was markedly less self-congratulatory than in recent years. President Emmanuel Macron inaugurated the event at Le Bourget airport after flying in on a hulking grey Airbus A330 refuelling tanker operated by the French Air Force.


New leak may confirm Samsung’s massive Galaxy Note 10 redesign

New leak may confirm Samsung’s massive Galaxy Note 10 redesignIt's still far too early to say for certain whether the Galaxy S10e, Galaxy S10, and Galaxy S10+ have truly been a success for Samsung. The second quarter of 2019 will be the first full quarter of sales for the company's new flagship phones series, so we should find out sometime next month whether the Galaxy S10 series gave Samsung's mobile division the boost it so sorely needed after last year's Galaxy S9 series was a flop. What we can say for certain, however, is that the Galaxy S10 series is a massive step in the right direction for Samsung. While last year's Galaxy S and Galaxy Note flagship phones were uninspired and boring, this year's Galaxy S10 phones finally feature the elegant redesign and all-screen display that Samsung fans have been craving.Thankfully, there's more good news on the way for Samsung fans, and it's much-needed considering the current Galaxy Fold disaster (though we totally warned you more than a year before it was announced that the Galaxy Fold would end up being a piece of junk). It turns out that the upcoming new Galaxy Note 10 is getting the same type of massive redesign that the Galaxy S10 got earlier this year, and now a new series of leaks may confirm Samsung's new design... or should we say, "designs."That's right, Samsung fans: for the first time ever, it appears as though Samsung will release not one but two different Galaxy Note phones. Just as Samsung followed Apple's lead with the Galaxy S10 series and added a (slightly) less expensive entry-level model, the Note 10 will seemingly have an entry-level model as well. This time around, the "Galaxy Note 10" will have slightly less impressive specs and a slightly lower price point, while the "Galaxy Note 10 Pro" will be the ultra high-end model with upgraded features and a price tag that's sure to make you cringe. An earlier report suggested that the Note 10 Pro model could start as high as $1,200 for the lowest amount of built-in storage.We've seen digital renders of both the Galaxy Note 10 and Galaxy Note 10 Pro already, and they came from Twitter user @OnLeaks, a source who regularly posts accurate renders of unreleased smartphones since the drawings are based on actual design files taken from the factory where these phones are manufactured. Here's a quick refresher that was posted last week:If previous leaks haven't been enough to convince you that this is what the upcoming Galaxy Note 10 and Galaxy Note 10 Pro will look like, we now have another set of leaks that further confirm the designs. A Twitter user named Sudhanshu Ambhore has posted photos of smartphone cases in the past that turned out to accurately depict the designs of unreleased smartphones. Now, he's back with two more cases.First, we have a case designed for the Galaxy Note 10, pictured first on its own and then a second time with a render of the Note 10 behind it.https://twitter.com/Sudhanshu1414/status/1139943092251795456Then, in a separate post on Twitter, we can see a Galaxy Note 10 Pro case from four different angles.https://twitter.com/Sudhanshu1414/status/1139942454122041345Samsung isn't expected to announce the Galaxy Note 10 or the Galaxy Note 10 Pro until sometime in early August, but don't expect the new design to be much of a surprise when the new phones are finally unveiled.


See Photos of the Porsche 718 Cayman GT4

See Photos of the Porsche 718 Cayman GT4


Whoops — The U.S. Army Owns Potentially Hundreds of Thousands of Faulty Guns

Whoops — The U.S. Army Owns Potentially Hundreds of Thousands of Faulty GunsIt’s an inescapable reality that in big institutions, people will sometimes overlook memos and misplace equipment.But that’s cold comfort to the U.S. Army, which is struggling to select a new handgun while also dealing with the fallout from its last, controversial pistol choice.That’s right — overlooked memos and misplaced equipment.This first appeared in 2016.In August 2015, the ground combat branch inspected its Beretta M-9 pistols to make sure the guns had key safety fixes. The Army was supposed to have finished upgrading all the guns … more than two decades ago.“During a training exercise, a soldier was injured when a slide failure resulted in the rear portion of the slide separating from the receiver and struck him in the face,” an official warning explained.“‘WARNING’: DEATH OR SERIOUS INJURY TO SOLDIERS, OR DAMAGE TO ARMY EQUIPMENT WILL OCCUR IF THE INSTRUCTIONS IN THIS MESSAGE ARE NOT FOLLOWED.”


Hong Kong leader fights for political life after bill fiasco

Hong Kong leader fights for political life after bill fiascoHong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam steadily climbed her way up bureaucratic ranks to capture the top position in the former British colony, relying on sheer intelligence, ambition, canny networking and an astute deference to authority. "They may not fire her immediately, but her chances for a second term are totally gone now and they may find a reason to let her go without losing much face because now she is hated by everybody in Hong Kong and her administration has become quite ungovernable," said Willy Lam, a veteran political observer.


U.S. 'probably had excellent presidents who were gay,' Buttigieg says

U.S. 'probably had excellent presidents who were gay,' Buttigieg saysIf South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg wins the 2020 election, he’ll be the first openly gay man to serve as president. But he says he’s “almost certain” he wouldn’t be the first gay president in U.S. history.


Belgian dad pleas for help to find son missing in Australia

Belgian dad pleas for help to find son missing in AustraliaAn encrypted phone message sent by a missing Belgian tourist could hold a clue to the 18-year-old's disappearance from an Australian coastal town, his father said on Monday. Theo Hayez was last seen leaving a Byron Bay nightclub late on May 31. Hayez on Monday made a public appeal for help to access his son's encrypted WhatsApp account.


JD.com may list logistics unit in future but no plan currently: exec

JD.com may list logistics unit in future but no plan currently: execChinese e-commerce giant JD.com Inc may list its logistics unit in the future but it currently has no clear plan, a senior company executive said on Monday. Bing Fu, head of planning and development at JD Logistics, made the comments to reporters on the sidelines of a media tour.


China warns US against opening Mideast 'Pandora's box'

China warns US against opening Mideast 'Pandora's box'China on Tuesday warned against opening a "Pandora's box" in the Middle East after the United States announced the deployment of 1,000 additional troops to the region amid escalating tensions with Iran. Foreign Minister Wang Yi also urged Tehran to not abandon the nuclear agreement "so easily" after Iran said it would exceed its uranium stockpile limit if world powers fail to fulfil their commitments under the agreement in 10 days. The United States ratcheted up pressure on Iran Monday, announcing the deployment of additional troops to the Middle East and producing new photographs it said showed Tehran was behind an attack on a tanker ship in the Gulf of Oman last week.


Boeing's embattled chief faces tough crowd at Paris Air Show

Boeing's embattled chief faces tough crowd at Paris Air ShowBoeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg will have his work cut out for him at the Paris Air Show this week as he tries to reassure airlines and industry partners over the fate of its flagship 737 MAX plane, indefinitely grounded after two fatal crashes.


Forensics firm says it can break into any iPhone or high-end Android phone

Forensics firm says it can break into any iPhone or high-end Android phoneApple makes it a point with every product announcement to stress security and privacy features. That exact thing happened just a few weeks ago at Apple's annual developer event, where the company unveiled several new privacy-centric features that other companies might not be able to replicate (because, you know, Android). But iPhone encryption is only as good as your password. If you don't use one, or if your password can be easily guessed, anyone with physical access to your phone can get into it. Then there are companies out there that specialize in unlocking mobile devices regardless of how strong the password is, companies that have been working with law enforcement agencies to crack devices during investigations. One of them is Israeli firm Cellebrite, which claims that it can now break into any iPhone or iPad running on Apple's latest iOS release, as well as high-end Android phones.In a somewhat unusual move, the company announced its capabilities on Twitter while introducing a brand new "exclusive" solution for law enforcement agencies.https://twitter.com/Cellebrite_UFED/status/1139569499206643715UFED Premium allows the company to extract data from all iOS and high-end Android devices, the company said. That means Cellebrite found a weak spot in Apple's armor that will enable it to crack any password and extract data from iOS devices. Cellebrite doesn't explain on its website how everything works, and this is probably a costly discovery. But if the company can unlock any iOS or Android phone, it means the latest versions of each operating system are susceptible to attacks:> Bypass or determine locks and perform a full file system extraction on any iOS device, or a physical extraction or full file system (File-Based Encryption) extraction on many high-end Android devices, to get much more data than what is possible through logical extractions and other conventional means.> > Gain access to 3rd party app data, chat conversations, downloaded emails and email attachments, deleted content and more, increase your chances of finding the incriminating evidence and bringing your case to a resolution.However, to unlock an iPhone or Android device, Cellebrite would need physical access to the phone or tablet in question. The product is explicitly targeting law enforcement agencies that would have in their possessions locked mobile devices they'd need to inspect.That doesn't mean Cellebrite can perform any remote breaches into iOS or Android devices, at least not with the help of this particular tool. The company did make the news a few years ago for allegedly unlocking an iPhone that belonged to one of the San Bernardino shooters for the FBI after Apple repeatedly refused requests to create a backdoor into its devices. Cellebrite, however, was not the company the FBI hired.A different security company called Grayshift has also made the news for having been able to unlock password-protected iPhones with the help of a special GrayKey machine. Apple, however, managed to block that hack. A similar cat and mouse game will probably follow for this new Cellebrite tool.Both Apple and Google have already announced the next-gen versions of iOS and Android. That's iOS 13, set for a mid-September launch, and Android 10 Q, which will be released about a month earlier.


Day after a nationwide register outage, Target's tech troubles continue on a smaller scale

Day after a nationwide register outage, Target's tech troubles continue on a smaller scaleThe great Target outage of 2019 continued on a smaller scale Sunday with shoppers reporting some stores were unable to process credit card purchases.


UPDATE 1-U.S. pedestrian, bicyclist deaths rise in 2018 -report

UPDATE 1-U.S. pedestrian, bicyclist deaths rise in 2018 -reportU.S. pedestrian and bicyclist deaths rose in 2018 while overall traffic deaths fell 1% in 2018 to 36,750, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) said in a preliminary report Monday. The auto safety agency said it did not know the cause of the overall decline but has said a dramatic increase in traffic deaths in 2016 was the result of more people killed on foot, bicycle or motorcycle. In 2018, the agency said pedestrian deaths were projected please to rise 4 percent and bicyclist deaths by 10 percent.


30+ Healthy Snacks Better Than Anything In A Vending Machine

30+ Healthy Snacks Better Than Anything In A Vending Machine


Biden Leads Pack of Democratic Hopefuls on Beat-Trump Factor

Biden Leads Pack of Democratic Hopefuls on Beat-Trump Factor(Bloomberg) -- Joe Biden leads in the early Democratic nomination race for 2020, helped by a sense that the former vice president is best placed to beat President Donald Trump, a new “CBS Battleground Tracker” poll shows.Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris, Bernie Sanders, and Pete Buttigieg are among the candidates that likely Democratic voters are at least considering in 18 states that will shape the initial 2020 fight, the poll shows.The CBS News/YouGov poll shows Biden had support of 31% of Democratic primary voters with three U.S. senators next: Warren of Massachusetts at 17%, Sanders of Vermont at 16%, and Harris of California at 10%. It was one of a number of recent national or state polls that showed Warren, a former Harvard law professor, in second place.Biden’s top-preference numbers would translate today into an estimated delegate standing of 731 delegates to Warren’s 355 and Sanders’ 317, CBS said.Democrats were split on whether the party’s message should emphasize returning the country to how it was before Trump, or pursue a more progressive agenda than they had under President Barack Obama. Among voters who want a more progressive direction, Biden is in much tighter competition with Warren and Sanders.Looking ahead to the general election, Democrats think swing voters -- in the abstract -- might be more favorable toward a white, male, moderate candidate, the poll showed.The survey of 16,624 registered voters in 18 states was conducted May 31 through June 12. The margin of error was plus or minus 1.5%.To contact the reporter on this story: Ros Krasny in Washington at rkrasny1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Craig Gordon at cgordon39@bloomberg.net, Mark NiquetteFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Record number of African migrants coming to Mexican border

Record number of African migrants coming to Mexican borderUndaunted by a dangerous journey over thousands of miles, people fleeing economic hardship and human rights abuses in African countries are coming to the U.S.-Mexico border in unprecedented numbers, surprising Border Patrol agents more accustomed to Spanish-speaking migrants. Officials in Texas and even Maine are scrambling to absorb the sharp increase in African migrants.


Bodies of missing Oregon mother, son found

Bodies of missing Oregon mother, son foundAuthorities have found the bodies of a missing Oregon woman and her 3-year-old son. The boy's biological father had been charged with killing them before the bodies were found. (June 17)


Intense Garlic Hack Has Captivated the Internet and People Have Never Been More Pumped to Peel

Intense Garlic Hack Has Captivated the Internet and People Have Never Been More Pumped to PeelThis is a life-changing hack for garlic lovers


Hong Kong activist Joshua Wong leaves jail, vows to join protests

Hong Kong activist Joshua Wong leaves jail, vows to join protestsLeading Hong Kong democracy activist Joshua Wong walked free from prison Monday and vowed to join historic anti-government protests rocking the finance hub, as activists kept up pressure on the city's embattled pro-Beijing leader. Organisers said some two million people -- more than a quarter of the population -- marched in tropical heat on Sunday calling for the resignation of chief executive Carrie Lam and protesting against a bill that would have allowed extraditions to the Chinese mainland. Police commissioner Stephen Lo said late Monday that only "some people" had rioted on that day, appearing to back down from previous comments from Lam, who described the June 12 protest as an "organised riot".